Edge.org contributors discuss the future of AI

https://intelligence.org/2015/11/01/edge-org-contributors-discuss-the-future-of-ai/?utm_source=MIRI+Newsletter&utm_campaign=5139cd6c32-Newsletter_2015_09&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e5b5cc41f3-5139cd6c32-73003417 November 1, 2015 | Rob Bensinger | News In January, nearly 200 public intellectuals submitted essays in response to the 2015 Edge.org question, “What Do You Think About Machines That Think?” (available online). The essay prompt began: In recent years, the 1980s-era philosophical discussions about artificial intelligence (AI)—whether computers can “really” think, refer, be conscious, and so on—have led to new conversations about how we should deal with the forms that many argue actually are implemented. These “AIs”, if they achieve “Superintelligence” (Nick Bostrom), could pose “existential risks” that lead to “Our Final Hour” (Martin Rees). And Stephen Hawking recently made international headlines when he noted “The development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race.” But wait! Should we also ask what machines that think, or, “AIs”, might be thinking about? Do they want, do they expect civil rights? Do they have feelings? What kind of government (for us) would an AI choose? What kind of society would they want to structure for themselves? Or is “their” society “our” society? Will we, and the AIs, include each other within our respective circles of empathy? The essays are now out in book form, and serve as a good quick-and-dirty tour of common ideas about smarter-than-human AI. The submissions, however, add up to 541 pages in book form, and MIRI’s focus onde novo AI makes us especially interested in the views of computer professionals. To make it easier to dive into the collection, I’ve collected a shorter list of links — the 32 argumentative essays written by computer scientists and software engineers.1 The resultant list includes three MIRI advisors (Omohundro, Russell, Tallinn) and one MIRI researcher (Yudkowsky). I’ve excerpted passages from each of the essays below, focusing on discussions of AI motivations and outcomes. None of the excerpts is intended to distill the content of the entire essay, so you’re encouraged to read the full essay if an excerpt interests you.

About basicrulesoflife

Year 1935. Interests: Contemporary society problems, quality of life, happiness, understanding and changing ourselves - everything based on scientific evidence. Artificial Intelligence Foundation Latvia, http://www.artificialintelligence.lv Editor.
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